Ocean Drive Noise Ordinance Goes into Effect

Susan Askew
Susan Askew

Ocean Drive Noise Ordinance Goes into Effect:

First weekend resulted in six warnings

A new noise ordinance went into effect last weekend that restricts “unnecessary and excessive noise” on Ocean Drive from 5th to 15th Streets. Exempt are properties between 9th and 11th Streets projecting noise to the east, an area that includes The Clevelander and Mango’s.
 
Following its passage, Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber said, “Undesirable noise in the corridor hasn’t only significantly impacted our emergency services and responders but has caused a gradual degradation of this iconic stretch. By placing restrictions on amplified sound, we hope to protect the interest and welfare of our residents and preserve the welcoming ambiance of the vibrant street for all to enjoy.”
 
At this week’s meeting of the Commission's Neighborhoods Committee, Miami Beach Police Chief Dan Oates said he was on Ocean Drive when the ordinance went into effect at 12:01 Sunday. He said he believed six warnings were issued as businesses are entitled to a warning first.  
 
A City records request turned up five violations on the first night: 720 Ocean Drive, the site of the Beacon South Beach and the Place Restaurant; 760 Ocean Drive, Wet Willie’s; 850 Ocean Drive, Caffe Milano; 860 Ocean Drive, Icon on the Ocean; and 660 Ocean Drive, the location of the Majestic Hotel. The following night, October 29th, one violation was issued to 750 Ocean Drive, the location of the Starlite Hotel. On Halloween, three violations were issued: 834 Ocean Drive, Kantina on the Beach; 1236 Ocean Drive, Il Giardino; and 1330 Ocean Drive, V Live. Il Giardino has had run-ins with the City before, losing its outdoor music permit for five months due to code violations.
 
Speaking of the noise ordinance, Oates said, “I think it has huge potential to make a difference for the blocks in which it's assigned. I’ll be out there again this weekend. We’ll see what the impact is. Again, from a policing standpoint, the rationale is if the noise is lower, the behavior changes. I’m hopeful that it’s going to make a difference.”
 
The City said in a press release about the new ordinance, “Current noise disturbances are predominately generated by loud radios, televisions, musical instruments, phonographs and other machines or devices that produce or reproduce sound – all of which are specifically addressed in the ordinance."
 
 

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